The Importance of Play for Under 8’s

So, I made a large number of Freedom of Information Requests to some Public Authorities. One of them being the Department for Education, in my request entitled Importance of Play for Under 8s. I have received a sort of response (after some hassles) which I am satisfied with. This response releases the following information:

1: Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage – Setting the standards for learning, development and care for children from birth to five.

2: Development Matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) – This non-statutory guidance material supports practitioners in implementing the statutory requirements of the EYFS.

3: Researching Effective Pedagogy in the Early Years.

In addition the DfE have linked me to the search results for all publications containing ‘Play’ in the title.

So, it is clear, from documents already in circulation, in addition to common sense, that children learn the most important lessons for their life in the first five years of their life. Lessons which involve their Primary Physical and Psychological development. I highly recommend looking at the guidance in (2) above, in addition to other information located at http://www.foundationyears.org.uk/.

Lizzie "The Immigrants Wife" – Bye Bye Papa

As posted previously, The Home Office expect my wife to leave the country and for myself to care for them alone. There are a number of moral problems to this, and whilst my wife is currently still in the country – is it fair for any child to have to go through the following:

This video is from here: http://youtu.be/kN6vuL8vrhg

This is clearly wrong. No child should be subjected to this treatment. We have the story of Skype Mummy (which The Home Office wants echoing over and over).

This clearly goes against both the UNCRC and TFEU.

Department for Education – Breast Feeding

SERP From Google For the Term "Department for Education Breast Feeding"
SERP From Google For the Term “Department for Education Breast Feeding”

So, I made a number of Freedom of Information Requests to several Public Authorities.  The Department for Education has came back rather promptly on the request I made to them DfE – Breast is Best, refusing the request stating that the information is not held.  However… This is clearly untrue.  I did a simple Google Search (to the left) and it resulted in a rather useful peice of information: The very first result being the Thesaurus Term for Breastfeeding.  This term inturn links through to the related content: Diet and nutrition in Early Years from 26 April 2012. The most useful piece of information on this page clearly states the following:

Infancy and childhood are of critical importance in the development of healthy bodies and habits. For example, breastfeeding gives babies all the nutrients they need and provides both mother and baby with a range of health benefits. The current advice is to continue for six months or longer.

Whilst I understand that it could well be the fact that this information is exempt under Section 21 of the FOI Act, the notice stated that no information was held. This is clearly untrue. I am obviously asking for an internal review on this basis. As I have found this information by a very simple Google search, it appears clear that the DfE hold information on this subject.

Preventing Illegal Working – "Employed or Self Employed" – It Matters

Disclaimer: This is in no way legal advice! It is simply an idea to approach for those family members who have a right of residence in the UK to approach when/if The Home Office refuse to accept this right.

As many people know, there is a Comprehensive Employers Guidance on preventing illegal working, that has been issued by The Home Office.  All of the media campaigns actually state that to employ a person could land you a £10,000 fine if that person turns out to be undocumented.  Numerous reports and updates on the Home Office News highlight how business owners are being fined as a result.

There is a SIMPLE workaround for this problem.  An EMPLOYER does not employ a SELF EMPLOYED person.  If you “sub-contract” your work to another individual, or “rent a chair” in a hair salon (for example) then The Home Office cannot actually fine the business owner.

On page 71, question 23 of the Comprehensive Employers Guidance highlights how you can tell if a person that you are looking to employ will be classed as someone who is‘self-employed’ or ‘an employee’.

I use the example of an hair dresser above, as this seems to be the prefered choice of Home Office raids.  The same works for many situations, IE: Delivery Drivers, Photographers, or Graphical Designers to name a few.

The Home Office may raise the concerns of whether the person who you are contracting your work to is registered with HMRC as a self-employed person.  This is not your problem.  You are requesting the services of another body.  Taxation on the part of the  self-employed contactor is something for them to sort out.

I raise this issue in knowing the following: A family member of an EEA national, or a Zambrano Carer does not legally have to register for a document certifying their right to reside and work.  However, if an employer employs such a person, they can still land potential fines of £10,000 per employee.

On deciding who is employed and self employed is still the decision of the “employer”.  However, HMRC have specific guidance on the matter which is available here: HMRC: Employed or Self-Employed.

It is useful for a business owner who needs additional help to use the HMRC’s Employment Status Indicator.  Also read the full guidance given by HMRC (in addition to the Home Office’s guidance).

 

Gather all of your documents

When you move to a new country, there are a fair few steps that you might need to take.  Something for sure is that you will need to ensure that you have all of the relevant documents to take with you.

Remember to pack the following documents:

  • Passports for everybody (EEA, Spouse, Children)
  • Marriage Certificates
  • Birth Certificates of children
  • Also do not forget to get your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) from your home Member State before leaving.  In the UK you can do this online on the NHS website: [Apply for UK EHIC]
  • Evidence of you relationship before going to the other EEA member state
  • Evidence of your national insurance contributions in the United Kingdom (This will be useful, as after excersising treaty rights in another EEA state you are classed as a worker, and therefore entitled to public funds as such)

 

Getting your spouse's visa to Ireland

This Article has moved. Please find it here.

Acquiring a Visa to Ireland

If your spouse (or other family member) requires a visa to enter the Republic of Ireland, then they need to apply for a visa to join the EU family member.  You can apply for a visa to Ireland using their AVATS system, but before applying check whether you actually require a visa.

As per Directive 2004/38/EC, all visas that are required for the family member of an EEA national, must be issued free of charge.

When applying for a visa for my wife, we submitted our visa directly to the Embassy of Ireland via post.

We submitted the following along with the signed declaration:

  • Copy of EU passport
  • Original Marriage Certificate
  • Letter from EU National stating:

I (Name) will be travelling with my spouse (name) on the DD MONTH, YEAR.  We will be travelling together.  We are applying for a Class C visa.  We have included a Special Delivery envelope with the application for the safe, secure return of all of our documents.

 

  • Birth certificates of our children
  • Passport of my wife (They then requested her old expired passport – so ensure you send them all – just keep copies)

I’m sure this doesn’t need stating: but send all documents SPECIAL DELIVERY.  And send a return Special Delivery envelope (Ensure you take note of the bar-code on the return envelope before sealing it into the envelope).

When you complete the AVATS system, you will need to print off the confirmation page to send with your application.  Remember to make a note of your application number and keep a second copy of the application form and confirmation page for your own records.

 

Getting your spouse’s visa to the Republic of Ireland

If your spouse (or other family member) requires a visa to enter the Republic of Ireland, then they need to apply for a visa to join the EU family member.  You can apply for a visa to Ireland using their AVATS system, but before applying check whether you actually require a visa.

As per Directive 2004/38/EC, all visas that are required for the family member of an EEA national, must be issued FREE OF CHARGE.

When applying for a visa for my wife, we submitted our visa directly to the Embassy of Ireland via post.

We submitted the following along with the signed declaration:

  • Copy of EU passport
  • Original Marriage Certificate
  • Letter from EU National stating:

I (Name) will be travelling with my spouse (name) on the DD MONTH, YEAR.  We will be travelling together.  We are applying for a Class D Long Stay visa.  We have included a Special Delivery envelope with the application for the safe, secure return of all of our documents.

 

  • Birth certificates of our children
  • Passport of my wife (They then requested her old expired passport – so ensure you send them all – just keep copies)

I’m sure this doesnt need stating: but send all documents SPECIAL DELIVERY.  And send a return Special Delivery envelope (Ensure you take note of the barcode on the return envelope before sealing it into the envelope).

When you complete the AVATS system, you will need to print off the confirmation page to send with your application.  Remember to make note and keep a second copy for your records.

 

BBC: “The Britons leaving the UK to get their relatives in”

The BBC Article can be found here: The Britons Leaving the UK to get their relatives in. It is a rather ‘enlightening’ article on the Surinder Singh Route for anybody who want’s to follow it up.

However, regardless of how insightful the article is, it is rather depressing that their headline is accusing British citizens of bypassing immigration regulations by using a technicality.  As it is outlined on the front page of this website.  This route is based on a ruling of the European Courts.  Any ruling in the European Courts is enforcable in the UK’s legislation.