Sample Letter to Register for a GP / Doctor in Ireland

Nobody plans to get ill, sick, or injured.  What if it happens though?  You’d like to know that your doctor has your history and that they can access it without any problems.  In addition to helping show that your Centre of Life has moved to the Host Member State you might want to register with a doctor.

To register with a doctor in Ireland, you will need to send them the following information:

  • Full Name
  • Sex
  • Date of Birth
  • Full Residential Address
  • Contact Details
  • Next of Kin
  • PPSN Number

A sample letter for such is attched below:

 

[ Name ]
[ Address]
[ Date ]

[ Address of GP ]

Dear Sir(s) / [ Name of Doctor ],

Patient Registration

I am writing today to register myself [ EU Name ] and family for services at your practice.  You can contact us via the following methods:

  • Telephone: 0999999999
  • Email: [ EU Email ]
  • Post: [ Residential Address ]

I would like to register the following people at your surgery for medical care:

  • Myself, [ EU Name ], [ Sex ], DOB: [ Date of Birth ], PPSN: [ PPSN Number ]
  • My Spouse and Next of Kin: [ Non-EU Name ], [ Sex ], DOB: [ Date of Birth ], PPSN: [ PPSN Number ]
  • [ And and children: ]
    • Our [ Son / Daughter ]: [ Name ], [ Sex ], DOB: [ …. ], PPSN: [ … ]

I would appreciate confirmation of our registration, either by post or email.  Should any further details be required please contact us using the details above.

Yours,

[ EU Sign (if written) ]
[ EU Name ]

EU1 Application – Self Employed Sample Support Letter of Support

Below is a sample letter that you can send in support of your Form EU1 Application in the Republic of Ireland.

Sample EU1 Application Letter of Support

[ EU NAME ]

[ Home Address ]
[ DATE ]
EU Treaty Rights Section

Irish Nationalisation and Immigration Service

Department of Justice and Equality

13/14 Burgh Quay

Dublin 2

 

Dear Sir(s)

EU1 Application – Letter of Support

Please find attached the Form EU1 application and a number of supporting documents for my spouse ([ NON-EEA NAME ])’s residence card on the basis of being married to a self employed EEA National within your state, in accordance with Article 10 of Directive 2004/38/EC.

 

My spouse entered Ireland with myself on the [ DATE ] via [ METHOD OF ENTRY ]. We reported to the Intreo Centre immediately to acquire her PPS Number.

 

In accordance with Article 6 of the Directive we understand that we do not need to register for a residence card until three months are over. However, we are applying early as we intend to make our home in Ireland. My spouse would also like to work and therefore a residence card will benefit us.

 

I regularly travel for work, so would request that our documents are returned as soon as possible. I am able to collect them from the INIS office should this be possible (My email is [ EU National’s Email Address ] and telephone number is [ EU National’s Telephone Number ]) – As a self employed individual I require my ID to travel throughout Europe (The UK do not issue national ID cards).

 

I am a self employed [ job title ]. I am registered for taxation with Revenue under the code [ REGISTRATION NUMBER – Usually PPSN ] and also have a registered business.

 

As evidence of my business activities within the state, I attach:

  • A copy of my registration letter for self employed taxation
  • A copy of both of my business name registration documents for CRO
    • [ Business Name ]
  • A copy of a few of my commission invoices for various reseller services
  • A selection of invoice copies to clients for my business activities.
  • Proof of domain name ownership
  • Website Printouts
  • Bank statements
  • ……

 

Should any further proof of self employment be required then I would be more than happy to provide this. I will provide my further bank statements as soon as possible (note that my Irish business bank account has only recently opened). As well as further invoices if they are required.

 

As evidence of residing within the state, I attach a copy of our PPSN letters, and copies of correspondence, and a copy of our tenancy agreement. We are awaiting our PRTB registration letter.

 

As proof of identity, we attach the passport of my spouse ([ Non EU Name ]) and myself the EU Citizen ([ EU NAME ]).

 

As the business is still in the early stages, I attach a print out of our joint account from the Bank of Ireland. I have also attached a copy of a letter relating to my recently opened Business Bank Account with the Bank of Ireland.

 

Whilst not a legal requirement, I attach a number of bank statements showing that I have sufficient funds to maintain my family, You will see funds of Sterling GBP in the following accounts in the UK:
…..
As well as funds of €xxxx.xx Euro in our joint bank account in Ireland.

 

My spouse ([ NON EU NAME ]) and myself ([EU NAME ]) have children together ([NAMES]) of whom we attach a copy of their Birth Certificates.

 

We will submit further documents in due course in relation to my income / self employment. I would appreciate the return of our documents speedily though, so as to exercise my treaty rights across the EU.

 

Yours Sincerely,

 

[ EU SIGN ]

[ EU NAME]

 

Sample Support Letter for a Self Employed EU1 Application

Below is a sample letter that you can send in support of your EU1 Application in the Republic of Ireland.

[ EU NAME ]

[ Home Address ]
[ DATE ]
EU Treaty Rights Section

Irish Nationalisation and Immigration Service

Department of Justice and Equality

13/14 Burgh Quay

Dublin 2

 

Dear Sir(s)

 

Please find attached the application and a number of supporting documents for my spouse ([ NON-EEA NAME ])’s residence card on the basis of being married to a self employed EEA National within your state, in accordance with Article 10 of Directive 2004/38/EC.

 

My spouse entered Ireland with myself on the [ DATE ] via [ METHOD OF ENTRY ]. We reported to the Intreo Centre immediately to aquire her PPSN.

 

In accordance with Article 6 of the Directive we understand that we do not need to register for a residence card until three months are over. However, we are applying early as we intend to make our home in Ireland. My spouse would also like to work and therefore a residence card will benefit us.

 

I regularly travel for work, so would request that our documents are returned as soon as possible. I am able to collect them from the INIS office should this be possible (My email is [ EU National’s Email Address ] and telephone number is [ EU National’s Telephone Number ]) – As a self employed individual I require my ID to travel throughout Europe (The UK do not issue national ID cards).

 

I am a self employed [ job title ]. I am registered for taxation with Revenue under the code [ REGISRATION NUMBER – Usually PPSN ] and also have a registered business.

 

As evidence of my business activities within the state, I attach:

  • A copy of my registration letter for self employed taxation
  • A copy of both of my business name registration documents for CRO
    • [ Business Name ]
  • A copy of a few of my commission invoices for various reseller services
  • A selection of invoice copies to clients for my business activities.
  • Proof of domain name ownership
  • Website Printouts

 

Should any further proof of self employment be required then I would be more than happy to provide this. I will provide my further bank statements as soon as possible (note that my Irish business bank account has only recently opened). As well as further invoices if they are required.

 

As evidence of residing within the state, I attach a copy of our PPSN letters, and copies of correspondence, and a copy of our tenancy agreement. We are awaiting our PRTB registration letter.

 

As proof of identity, we attach the passport of my spouse ([ Non EU Name ]) and myself the EU Citizen ([ EU NAME ]).

 

As the business is still in the early stages, I attach a print out of our joint account from the Bank of Ireland. I have also attached a copy of a letter relating to my recently opened Business Bank Account with the Bank of Ireland.

 

Whilst not a legal requirement, I attach a number of bank statements showing that I have sufficient funds to maintain my family, You will see funds of Sterling GBP in the following accounts in the UK:
…..
As well as funds of €xxxx.xx Euro in our joint bank account in Ireland.

 

My spouse ([ NON EU NAME ]) and myself ([EU NAME ]) have children together ([NAMES]) of whom we attach a copy of their Birth Certificates.

 

We will submit further documents in due course in relation to my income / self employment. I would appreciate the return of our documents speedily though, so as to exercise my treaty rights across the EU.

 

Yours Sincerely,

 

[ EU SIGN ]

[ EU NAME]

 

Sample letter of application for an EHIC

I previously posted regarding applying for an EHIC.  To do so not only increases your centre of life requirement, but is also a sensible move if your non-eu family member does not hold an EHIC issued by another member state (IE: The UK).

[ EU Citizen Name ]

[ Home Address ]

DATE: xx/xx/xxxx

[ Address of Local Health Office ]

Dear Sir(s)

APPLICATION FOR AN EHIC

Please find attached my application form for an European Health Insurance Card issued by the Irish Health Services Executive.  I am applying for myself [

EU NAME ] as a British Citizen and my non-EEA Family Member [ Non-EEA Name ].

I am [ an employed / a self-employed ] individual within Ireland.

I am aware that I must plan to be resident within Ireland for at least twelve months before I can apply for an Irish EHIC.  I attach a number of documents to support this fact.

Along with this application, you will find copies of the following documents:

[ *** DELETE AS APPROPRIATE / ADD EXTRA RELEVANT ITEMS]

Proof of Residence:

*Letter from my landlord

*Letter from PRTB

*Tenancy agreement [ highlight if it exceeds twelve months ]

 

Proof of employment [ Letter, contract of employment ] *Tax Registration Certificate

*Business name registration certificates

*PPSN Letters

*Bank account statements

*Business bank account statements and letters

 

Your’s

[ Signed ]

[ EU Citizen Name]

 

You can find addresses to Local Health Offices here: Local Health Office Addresses

How long do I need to live in another member state to qualify under Surinder Singh?

There has been a lot of talk on the internet of late regarding the new Home Office’s Centre of Life Requirement for Surinder Singh.  I see lots of people saying that “You must excercise treaty rights for at least X months“.  Today infact, a member of the EEA Visa group actually said that The Home Office informed her that she must excercise treaty rights for at least six months to qualify.

This is not correct!  Absolute rubbish, and totally out of order for the Home Office to claim such.

As previously linked to: The Home Office’s Centre of Life guidance clearly states the following:

Generally, the longer the British citizen has been exercising Treaty rights in another EEA member state, the more likely it is that they will have transferred the centre of their lives.

There is still no minimum time period that must be spent in the host member state and all cases must be assessed on their own merits.

This should also be noted along with the Opinion of Advocate General Sharpston in the Case of S and O.

 

Also, if in doubt, simply rely on the word of law.  Regulation 9 of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 places absolutely no time limits.  To do so would be a good move for Singher’s everywhere as there would be goalposts.  The Home Office have simply implemented the Centre of Life requirement so as to allow it’s ECO’s a reason for refusal of any application.

The reasons being spouted by ECO’s are rediculous.

Obviously, the burden of proof is upon the applicant as a balance of probabilities.  It is best to provide as strong an application for an EEA Family Permit or Residence Card as possible.  Ensure that your covering letter includes the reason that you are returning to the UK.  These reasons might well be:

  • Job Offer
  • Seriously ill family member
  • Contact issues with children of a previous relationship (at which Section 55 would also apply)

The UK, as outlined within it’s response, has a duty to assess all cases on their own merits.  This was established in the case of Akrich Case C-109/01, along with the fact that you benefit from provision of EC law even if you deliberately place yourself into a position to benefit from EC law.

 

 

Right to Vote: Non-EEA National Family Members

A Non-EEA National Family Member should be afforded all of the rights that a local citizen is afforded.  One of these rights is the Right to Vote!  A user on What Do They Know has requested information in regards to this right.

The Local Authority (Birmingham City Council) responded amazingly promptly (the next working day) with the following response:

A person’s eligibility to be added to the register for voting purposes, is based on their nationality, not marital status.

Only British, Commonwealth, Irish & European Union citizens are allowed to register and therefore to vote.

An Indian national can vote in all elections, because India is part of the Commonwealth.

This is immediately good news for all of the citizens of the Fifty-three countries which are members of The Commonwealth (list linked).

However the request has been further clarified by the user so as to include individuals that are not citizens of member states.  Logically the answer is very clear that persons admitted under Directive 2004/38/EC should be afforded the right to vote (even more so considering that citizens of India can vote as they are citizens of a Commonwealth country).

The Directive clearly outlines that individuals benefiting from the right of Free Movement should also benefit from Equal Treatment to local residents.

(20) In accordance with the prohibition of discrimination on grounds of nationality, all Union citizens and their family members residing in a Member State on the basis of this Directive should enjoy, in that Member State, equal treatment with nationals in areas covered by the Treaty, subject to such specific provisions as are expressly provided for in the Treaty and secondary law.

This is clearly outlined in Article 24 – Equal Treatment:

1. Subject to such specific provisions as are expressly provided for in the Treaty and secondary law, all Union citizens residing on the basis of this Directive in the territory of the host Member State shall enjoy equal treatment with the nationals of that Member State within the scope of the Treaty. The benefit of this right shall be extended to family members who are not nationals of a Member State and who have the right of residence or permanent residence.

Also note: This section states “who have the right of residence” and it does not state “who hold a residence card”.  The  absence of a residence card issued in accordance with Article 10 (in the UK this would be the card issued once you have completed the EEA2 application) does not mean that you are not covered by Article 24 of Directive 2004/38/EC if you have rights that stem from the Directive.

 

Homeless Assistance in the UK

The law in the UK makes it an obligation of your local council to ensure that you have adequate accomodation.  This means that if you are legally homeless then your council must help you.

How much help your local council must give you depends on a number of facts:

  • Are you homeless through no fault of your own?
  • What is your level of need (Any disabilities, dependant children etc?)

You can check out if your council must give you emergency housing on Shelter’s Emergency Housing Rights Checker.

Legally Homeless

Legally Homeless is a term used by local council’s and government.

You may be legally homeless if:

  • you’ve no legal right to live in accommodation anywhere in the world
  • you can’t get into your home – eg your landlord has locked you out
  • it’s not reasonable to stay in your home – eg risk of violence or abuse
  • you’re forced to live apart from your family or people you normally live with because there’s no suitable accommodation for you
  • you’re living in very poor conditions – eg overcrowding

If you’re legally homeless, your council must provide you with help – this could range from giving advice to arranging accommodation for you.

The amount of help they give you will depend on things like:

  • if you became homeless through no fault of your own
  • if you’re eligible for assistance
  • if you’re in priority need

Eligibility for assistance

If you live permanently in the UK, you will usually be eligible for assistance. If you’re from abroad, you may not be eligible because of your immigration status.

Shelter’s emergency housing rights checker helps you work out if you’re eligible for assistance and what you’re entitled to.

Priority need

You’re in priority need if:

  • you or someone you live with is pregnant
  • ‘dependent children’ live with you (under 16s or under 19s if they’re studying full-time)
  • you’re ‘vulnerable‘, eg as a result of old age or disability
  • you’re homeless after a flood, fire or other disaster

You may be entitled to Housing Benefit to help with your housing costs.  If you are claiming Housing Benefit, ensure that you specifically request the local council to assess you for “Local Council Tax Reduction” as this is an entirely different benefit.

Shelter: The Housing and Homelessness Charity provide excellent advice and help to people.  If you have any further information requirements then do not hesitate to contact them.

Also, an additional piece of legislation may help if you have children:  Section 17 of The Childrens Act 1989 puts a duty of care on the local authority for children living in their area – regardless of their/their parents immigration status.  Section 17(6) specifically stating:

(6) The services provided by a local authority in the exercise of functions conferred on them by this section may include [providing accommodation and] giving assistance in kind or  . . in cash.

 

I am in no way suggesting that people coming home go directly to their local councils.  Please try and ensure that you aren’t going to end up on the streets when you return home to the UK.  However, If you arrange to sleep on a mates sofa, you are still considered as homeless.

Can My Parents or My Spouses Parents Benefit From Surinder Singh?

As explained on Who Can Benefit From Surinder Singh The Surinder Singh Route is open to dependant parents of either the EU National or their spouse.  This fact is outlined clearly within  an official response from The Home Office on 29th November 2013 which you can find here: Surinder Singh Route for Parents.

The Home Office responded to the user’s Freedom of Information request with a generic response and treated the request as a general enquiry (as the user had not specifically requested the release of information, but instead requested clarification of Home Office policy).

For ease the actual response from The Home Office is below:

Dear Mr Syal,

Thank you for your email of 8 November to the Home Office Freedom of Information team seeking clarification of whether dependent parents can qualify for residence documentation under the Surinder Singh route.  Your email has been passed to this team to respond to, as we are responsible for policy guidance on European Economic Area (EEA) nationals and their family members.  I understand the Freedom of Information team has advised you that your query is being dealt with as a general policy enquiry, since you are seeking clarification of the policy rather than requesting the release of documents or recorded information held by the Home Office.

I can confirm that the Surinder Singh route applies to direct family members, as defined by regulation 7(1)(a)-(c) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 (‘the EEA Regulations’), provided they meet the requirements set down in regulation 9 of the EEA Regulations.

Direct family members for these purposes are:

  • the spouse or civil partner of the British citizen, provided they lived with the British citizen in the EEA state in which the British citizen was exercising free movement rights;
  • direct descendants (children, grandchildren) of the British citizen, or of the British citizen’s spouse or civil partner, provided they are aged under 21 or dependent on the British citizen or the British citizen’s spouse/civil partner; and
  • dependent direct relatives in the ascending line (i.e. parents and grandparents) of the British citizen, or of the British citizen’s spouse or civil partner.

Therefore, a financially dependent parent of a British citizen can qualify under Surinder Singh/regulation 9, provided the British citizen was engaged in genuine and effective employment or self-employment in another EEA state before returning to the UK.

You can view the provisions of the EEA Regulations referred to above via the following link: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/1003/contents/made

I hope this has clarified the position.

Kind regards,

European Operational Policy Team

Operational Policy & Rules Unit

Immigration & Border Policy Directorate

Home Office